Stainless Steel Pipe Prices – A New Market Flood?

Plumbing has come a long way in the last 2,000 years. Yes, Ancient Romans are famous for their aqueducts, surely one of mankind’s greatest inventions, but what we must also remember is that those same Romans were the first civilization to transport water with the use of lead, a toxin. Now, as it turns out, the Romans lucked out by having high calcium content in their drinking water, which coated their pipes and kept them safe (the same could not be said about their lead cookware, unfortunately).

Since that time, humans have gone through many different materials to convey their water. Wood was used in Britain and Early America, for example. Concrete has been used, a material that Romans would have approved of. In modern America, copper has long been the choice, but with the ever-rising cost of copper, that may be finally changing.

Enter stainless steel, an American classic.

More and more, homeowners, businesses, and contractors alike are heading to steel pipe supply companies for their water conveyance needs. Surprisingly, they cite cost, among many other things, as one of their main reasons for changing. Stainless steel pipe prices may not be the same as copper, but as any contractor will tell you, many factors go into the final cost of a product.

First off, steel pipe is lighter than copper, so transporting it is cheaper. The initial savings here may be minimal, but for contractors who make repeated trips to steel pipe supply companies, this means big savings. Contractors will also be quick to note that stainless steel pipe is less likely to be stolen by worksite thieves, who have become a real nuisance to anyone installing copper in the last decade or so.

Home and business owners will also be happy to know that stainless steel pipe prices also lessen over the long term, for many reasons. Stainless steel pipe requires no coating, yet it resists both internal and external corrosion, meaning that it will last longer and require fewer repairs and replacements.

Stainless steel’s sturdiness also means that it can be laid over longer stretches than copper, a benefit of particular interest to owners of larger buildings. Longer pipes mean fewer connections, and fewer connections mean less leaking and less overall maintenance.

Stainless steel also has a lower coefficient of friction, meaning it yields higher water pressure at the point of use and is safer for drinking, with any leaching chemicals well below recommended limits.

And if these cost-reducing and health factors aren’t enough, business and home owners will be happy to know that stainless steel is completely recyclable material. After its use, or if a piece needs to be replaced, the old pipe may be sold to recoup some of its original cost.

Whether stainless steel pipes will begin flooding the market in the years to come is yet to be seen. However, one thing is certain: for copper, the pressure is on.

When Can Bursting a Pipe Be a Good Thing?

When you think about the words “bursting a pipe,” do they sound in any way good to you? No! Of course not!

Bursting a pipe if you’re a home or business owner must mean that you’re going to have to pay big money to bring in someone to fix this pipe that has burst.

Pipe bursting, though, is actually a process used by plumbers to replace deteriorating or undersized gas, water, or sewer pipes without causing much interference with the ground above the pipes.

Picture this, you have an older home, and you are about to do a major remodel on it. Changes are your main sewer line is not only deteriorating, but it is also going to be too small for the additions that you are putting onto your home. But the thing is, you don’t want to have to tear up your entire back yard just to get a new sewer line put in, so what do you do?

Plumbers now have the ability to replace these pipes without digging out the large trenchline that was initially dug to install the sewer line. Instead of digging up the whole trench, plumbers dig two holes, and place the new line in the first hole, and pole the line through the existing pipe to the other whole where the pipe ends.

The reason this is called pipe bursting is because as the new line is pulled through the old line, there is a head on the front of the new line that actually shatters the old pipe and pushes it into the surrounding dirt. This process only works, though, if the old pipe is made out of fracturable material such as clay, iron, concrete ABS, and PVC.

The new type of pipe that is replacing the old pipe is much sturdier and is also smoother. It is called polyethylene pipe, also called PE pipe. It is electro-fused together which gives it the smoothness and makes it one seemless line, comparatively to your old piping. The new polyethylene pipe is also more resistant to abrasion. It will also not be damaged by microbiologically induced corrosion or chemically induced corrosion.

So if you are considering having new piping put into your home or business, whether it be for your gas, water, or sewer, make sure that you hire a plumber who can give you this trenchless pipe replacement. If you don’t, you’re risking your entire lawn being destroyed by the process of retrenching.

Understanding the Pipe Coating Process and Why It’s Better Than Full Replacement